Breach of COVID-19 management plan – Darwin

Source: Northern Territory Police

Northern Territory Police have issued an infringement notice to a 30-year-old man for breaching his quarantine requirements under his COVID-19 Management Plan.  

The man from regional Victoria had been approved to undertake essential work and arrived in the Northern Territory on Friday 16 October 2020.

He underwent a test which returned a negative result. Under his COVID-19 safety management plan, the man was required to quarantine in Darwin before attending his place of work.

A compliance team conducted a check at his accommodation on Monday 19 October 2020 however, the man was not present at the time. He was contacted by police and was told to immediately return to his accommodation.

The man has since returned a second negative test however, will be required to undertake 14 days quarantine.

While the region the man came from is deemed low-risk, failure to adhere to his COVID-19 plan is considered a serious breach.

Additionally, an 18-year-old man has been issued with an infringement notice after failing to wear a mask in the Howard Springs Quarantine Facility as per quarantine requirements. The man had been previously cautioned on a number of occasions.

The infringement penalty for failing to abide by the Chief Health Officer Directions issued under section 56 of the Public and Environment Health Act 2011 is $5,056 for an individual and $25,280 for a business.

NT Police and Environmental Health Officers continue to undertake compliance activities.

32,955 compliance checks have now been completed and 152 fines have been issued.

For information on coronavirus (COVID-19), visit www.coronavirus.nt.gov.au .

Breach of COVID-19 management plan – Darwin

Source: Northern Territory Police

Northern Territory Police have issued an infringement notice to a 30-year-old man for breaching his quarantine requirements under his COVID-19 Management Plan.  

The man from regional Victoria had been approved to undertake essential work and arrived in the Northern Territory on Friday 16 October 2020.

He underwent a test which returned a negative result. Under his COVID-19 safety management plan, the man was required to quarantine in Darwin before attending his place of work.

A compliance team conducted a check at his accommodation on Monday 19 October 2020 however, the man was not present at the time. He was contacted by police and was told to immediately return to his accommodation.

The man has since returned a second negative test however, will be required to undertake 14 days quarantine.

While the region the man came from is deemed low-risk, failure to adhere to his COVID-19 plan is considered a serious breach.

Additionally, an 18-year-old man has been issued with an infringement notice after failing to wear a mask in the Howard Springs Quarantine Facility as per quarantine requirements. The man had been previously cautioned on a number of occasions.

The infringement penalty for failing to abide by the Chief Health Officer Directions issued under section 56 of the Public and Environment Health Act 2011 is $5,056 for an individual and $25,280 for a business.

NT Police and Environmental Health Officers continue to undertake compliance activities.

32,955 compliance checks have now been completed and 152 fines have been issued.

For information on coronavirus (COVID-19), visit www.coronavirus.nt.gov.au .

Emily Becke wanted on warrant

Source: State of Victoria Police

Tuesday, 20 October 2020 04:18

Police are appealing for public assistance to help locate Mildura woman Emily Becke.

The 36-year-old has an outstanding warrant for armed robbery.

Becke is described as Caucasian in appearance, 180cm tall, with a solid build and short black hair.

She is known to frequent Mildura, Red Cliffs and metropolitan Melbourne.

Investigators have released images of Becke in the hope someone may have information on her current whereabouts.

Anyone who sights Becke or has information about her current whereabouts is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or make a confidential report at www.crimestoppersvic.com.au.

Glenn Manison

Media Advisor

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Darryl Heathcote wanted on warrant

Source: State of Victoria Police

Tuesday, 20 October 2020 03:34

Police are appealing for public assistance to help locate Darryl Heathcote.

The 56-year-old is wanted on an outstanding warrant for armed robbery.

Heathcote is described as 170cm tall, with a medium build, grey hair and green/hazel eyes.

He is known to frequent the Latrobe Valley.

Investigators have released an image of Heathcote in the hope someone may have information on his current whereabouts.

Anyone who sights Heathcote or has information about his current whereabouts is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or make a confidential report at www.crimestoppersvic.com.au.

Leading Senior Constable Rohan Imms

Media Officer

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Torres Strait Tropical Rock Lobster Fishery – Application 2020

Source: Australian Department of the Environment and Energy

« Torres Strait Tropical Rock Lobster Fishery

Environmental Assessment under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
Australian Fisheries Management Authority October 2020

Agency application on ecological sustainability

About the application

The current export approval for the Torres Strait Tropical Rock Lobster Fishery is valid until 17 December 2020 and the fishery is now due for assessment for ongoing export accreditation. The Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment received an application from the Australian Fisheries Management Authority on 13 October 2020.

The application has been prepared to address the Australian Government Guidelines for the ecologically sustainable management of fisheries – 2nd edition and to provide updates on the implementation of any conditions or recommendations made in the previous Australian Government assessment. The application will be used to assess the operation of the fishery for the purposes of Part 13 and Part 13A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

Consideration will be given to:

  • including in the list of exempt native specimens, specimens harvested in the Torres Strait Tropical Rock Lobster Fishery under the provisions of the Protected Zone Joint Authority in accordance with the Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984 and the Torres Strait Fisheries Regulations 1985.
  • declaring the Commonwealth Torres Strait Tropical Rock Lobster Fishery, as managed consistent with the Commonwealth Torres Strait Fisheries Act 1984 and the Torres Strait Fisheries Regulations 1985, as an approved wildlife trade operation under section 303FN of the EPBC Act, and

In accordance with the provisions of sections 303FR and 303DC of the EPBC Act, you are invited to comment on this proposal.

Keynote address to FSC Future of Advice Summit

Source: Australia Government Ministerial Statements

Introduction

Good morning everyone. Thank you Sally for the invitation to join you today for your Summit. It’s terrific to be able to speak to you this morning from Canberra, and to join you for the launch of the Future of Advice report.

The launch of this research is the first step in the policy debate on advice, and it is excellent that the FSC is leading that process as it launches a Green Paper informed by this research, industry and your input as participants.

As the Government progresses change and its legislative program, we welcome this debate and solutions from industry with a clear consumer rationale.

It’s excellent to see the FSC stepping up to set the policy debate on advice what it is and what it will be in coming years.

The financial advice sector is a state of real transformation at the moment. Not only is the sector going through the process of professsionalisation, but we’re also seeing the industry adapt and innovate in response to challenges of COVID-19.

COVID-19 has really put the industry in a pressure cooker and sped up some of the gradual change that’s been happening, particularly around client interaction and digital tools.  Social distancing – a term we have never even heard of this time last year – has completely changed the way that advisers interact with clients.

The Government has been working closely with ASIC to ensure to make it as easy as possible for you to do your jobs in a COVID-safe way.

Now as we move into the recovery phase, financial advice is going to be as critical as ever.

Professionalisation of the industry

Despite the challenges we’ve all faced, I’m optimistic about where the industry is headed.

There are 900 students enrolled in FASEA approved bachelor degrees, and over 190 professional year candidates have joined the industry to date. As the industry continues to professionalise, I’m confident these numbers will only grow further.

I know many of you have expressed some anxiety about the FASEA exam – but I think it’s fair to say those fears have been allayed as the exams have progressed.

I was glad to finally see the legislation pass the Parliament in June to provide additional time for existing advisers to meet the qualification and examination requirements set by FASEA.

Of the 22,000 advisers on the Financial Adviser Register, close to 10,000 have already passed the exam. The remaining advisers have over one year and seven more exams available before the end of the transition period.

The reforms are working their way through the system and I’m confident standards will bring financial advisers in line with other professions – like lawyers, doctors and accountants.

Next steps

The next step in this process involves the Government establishing the single disciplinary body for financial advisers.

It’s a significant step. As you might recall, Commissioner Hayne noted that the financial advice industry lacked a ‘credible and coherent system of professional discipline’, describing the current arrangements as ‘fragmented’.

The final report of the Royal Commission recommended a new disciplinary system for financial advisers, including specifically a single, central disciplinary body.

The Government agreed with the recommendation and we believe the body will streamline and encourage greater professional discipline in the industry.

Following consultation, we’re now working through the detail and we intend to introduce legislation by mid-2021.

We’re also looking to establish a forward-looking compensation scheme of last resort — a substantial step in rebuilding trust and confidence in the financial system’s dispute resolution framework. Again, we are aiming to introduce legislation by mid next year.

These commitments are the next step in ensuring that our financial advice industry becomes a true profession and we’ll have more to say on both of these commitments in due course.

Trust in financial advice

I recently listened to a speech that ASIC Chair, James Shipton, gave on trust and social licence in the financial system. He made some excellent points about the role of a professional culture in establishing trust in an industry – and I’d really like to touch on that in the context of talking about the future of financial advice.

The professional standards reforms were borne from concerns that the existing standards for advisers were not setting a high enough bar, eroding the trust that Australians had in financial advisers.

An ASIC report from August last year found that 1 in 5 Australians do not trust financial advisers. This distrust was one of the key barriers to seeking financial advice.

There is some way to go in rebuilding trust in this industry – and to come back to the point made by James Shipton – a clear professional culture and the features that come along with it will go a long way in remedying this trust deficit.

This sentiment has been the underlying thread behind our reforms to implement the recommendations of Commissioner Hayne. Our response to the Royal Commission was indeed titled “Restoring trust in Australia’s financial system”.

In that response, the Treasurer was clear in his message to the financial sector: “the interests of consumers must now come first. From today the sector must change, and change forever.”

Professionalisation – and everything that comes with it – educational requirements, a Code of Ethics and soon to be a new disciplinary system – is part of that change.

Red tape reduction

I know that the road to professionalisation has not been free of bumps.

Since taking the role of Assistant Minister for Financial Services, I’ve met with hundreds of individual advisers and brokers, one on one and in small groups, to discuss the issues facing your industry.

I want you to know that I am listening and I am taking on board what you’re saying. I am working to address your biggest concerns.

While we, like you, are focused on lifting the standards across the board for advice and implementing all the recommendations of the Royal Commission – I’m also constantly looking for opportunities for red tape reduction, identifying obstacles to productivity and profitability, and reducing the burden on your industry and its participants.

It’s not just because you’re noisy. Working to make your life easier, makes our life easier. Financial advisers are a critical part of our economy and will be critical in our COVID recovery. I’m not ashamed to say that the Government has a vested interest in ensuring that you can provide financial advice to as many Australians as possible without being tied up in red tape.

I’ve been working closely with ASIC, who understand the problems facing your industry, to come up with solutions that both make it easier to do your job and that meet our objectives.

To put it simply, this Government is committed to:

  • A professional financial advice industry;
  • With a lower level of overall regulation;
  • Ultimately leading to better advice for Australians.

Role of technology in the future of financial advice

There is much uncertainty about what the future may hold yet it’s safe to say it’s going to involve a greater reliance on technology.

We understand that advisers have to price their advice to reflect the many hours of work they put in behind the scenes to provide the best quality of advice.

Often that goes way beyond the time required for a face-to-face meeting.

If consumers have to pay many thousands of dollars for a Statement of Advice, then many people who need that advice most will not be able to access it.

It’s not particularly useful if customers are paying for the manual production of hundreds of pages, much of which is boiler plate and they won’t read.

So what I’m focused on is helping advisers get access to the tools they need to deliver high-quality, compliant advice at an affordable price.

That can happen, but to do it, it’s going to need a greater role for technology.

And it’s going to involve the regulators taking a more forward-leaning approach to the rollout of technology that helps advisers do their job. 

For financial advisers, it can unlock productivity.

It can enable them to deliver more good quality advice, to more people, in less time. 

And most importantly, it can let them focus on the most rewarding and highest value-adding part of their jobs — spending more time with their clients, listening to their needs, tailoring solutions, and discussing their recommended actions.

I hope that I’ve made it clear that the Government is here to help you in achieving these things – we want to encourage the uptake of technology, and at the end of the day see better outcomes for your clients.

The Government is here to work with you – not against you. Our objectives are ultimately aligned – we want a financial advice system that is accessible and affordable, and one that ensures the quality of advice across the board.

Conclusion 

With that sentiment, I’ll wrap up my remarks.

Thank you again for the invitation to speak today – it’s terrific to have to opportunity to talk about the future of financial advice in Australia in such a big picture way.

I look forward to delving into the FSC’s Future of Advice report and hearing about the conversations that happen through the Summit this morning.

Thank you – I’d be happy to take some questions now.

Nightingale’s lamp casts light on leadership

Source: State of Tasmania Government

Premier of Tasmania – Nightingale’s lamp casts light on leadership

20 October 2020

Sarah Courtney, Minister for Health

Tasmania has more than 9,000 private and public nurses and midwives who do a wonderful job and are the backbone of our health system.

The Department of Health is encouraging those nurses and midwives aged up to 35-years-old to develop their leadership skills through the 2020 Nightingale Challenge.

The World Health Organization’s 2020 Year of the Nurse and Midwife marks Florence Nightingale’s 200th birthday by helping nurses and midwives prepare for their expanding roles in health.

The challenge provides a series of international webinars and a practice development workshop and offers nurses and midwives the chance to network with colleagues worldwide.

I would strongly encourage Tasmanian nurses and midwives aged 35 years or under who want to develop their leadership skills and positively contribute to their profession to apply.

Applications are open and close 2 November 2020.

Further information about the challenge, including an application form, is available at www.health.tas.gov.au/healthprofessionals/nursing/conferences_and_events/nightingale_challenge

Email ocnm@health.tas.gov.au or call 6166-1570 during normal office hours for more information.

Expressions of Interest – Chairperson – State Fire Commission

Source: Tasmania Police

Expressions of Interest – Chairperson – State Fire Commission – Tasmania Police

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Expressions of Interest – Chairperson – State Fire Commission

Tuesday, 20 October 2020 – 1:52 pm.

Expressions of Interest are sought from interested people for the position of independent Chairperson of the State Fire Commission (SFC).
The State Fire Commission is an independently chaired body established under Section 7 of the Fire Service Act 1979.
The State Fire Commission’s primary purpose is to minimise the social, economic and environmental impact of fire and other emergencies on the Tasmanian community. This is achieved through implementing strategies for the Tasmania Fire Service that develop resilience to prevent and prepare for emergencies.
The Commission is also responsible for:
managing incidents involving hazardous materials, including response to terrorist incidents involving chemical, biological and radiological agents;
road crash rescue (in Hobart, Launceston, Burnie, Devonport and surrounding areas);
providing an Urban Search and Rescue capability to manage the rescue of people from collapsed buildings and structures;
a range of community fire safety programs that guard against structural fire and bushfire;
fire investigations; and
coordinating Fuel Reduction Program activities on behalf of the Government.
Additionally, a change in reporting requirements now sees the Director State Emergency Service (SES) report to the Chief Officer with a substantial component of funding for the SES being provided through the State Fire Commission. The State Fire Commission reports to the Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Management, and the supporting agency is the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management. The Commission delivers all of its services through its operational arm, the Tasmania Fire Service. The functions of the Commission are set out in Section 8 of the Fire Service Act 1979.
The Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Management is seeking an independent Chairperson for the State Fire Commission. The successful applicant will be nominated by the Minister and appointed by the Governor-in-Council.
The Chair is the public advocate for the SFC and is supported by the Chief Officer. The Chair’s role and responsibilities include: Be the first point of contact and the ‘public voice’ of the SFC, including Representation in the media, Focus the SFC on achieving its Functions; Report to the Minister on the activities of the SFC; Undertake public duties on behalf of the SFC; Lead SFC meetings; Undertake consultation or briefings as required on behalf of the SFC; and provide advice to the Minister.
Applicants must provide a statement that outlines their suitability for the role and a copy of their current Curriculum Vitae or Resume. The appointment will be for three years on a part-time basis with remuneration of $35,000 per annum. In addition, allowances will be paid by way of reimbursement of reasonable, actual out-of-pocket expenses incurred in carrying out the business of the Commission.
Further information regarding the role can be obtained from the Secretary of the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management, Mr Darren Hine at 6173 2247 or via email to Ms Kate Baker, Executive Assistant to the Secretary: kate.baker@police.tas.gov.au . Applications must be submitted to: the Office of the Secretary, Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management, GPO Box 308, Hobart, Tasmania, 7001 or email to: commissioner@police.tas.gov.au  by 5.00pm, Friday 30 October 2020.

City’s fund supports community connections

Source: Government of Western Australia

The City of Wanneroo’s Community Response and Recovery Fund is reviving and strengthening local groups and sporting clubs as they recover from the financial impacts of COVID-19.

Mayor Tracey Roberts said the new Fund was already making a positive difference in the community.

“Our clubs are a very important part of our community,” Mayor Roberts said. “They bring people together, provide opportunities for social interaction and help people stay physically and mentally healthy.

“The City of Wanneroo is proud to support our local clubs and groups through the Fund, including fee waivers and concessions for use of City facilities.”

Anita Diep, President of Dynamic Flame Badminton Club, said the Fund was already making a tangible difference for the club, which was significantly affected by the pandemic.

“We were very happy that our club was given permission by the City to resume badminton at Kingsway Indoor Stadium, however many players didn’t return due to concerns about the virus,” Ms Diep said. “We are still missing some of our older generation players.”

“The reduction in playing numbers led to reduced income; we couldn’t meet the costs required for coaching and court hire and had to dig into our cash reserves.

“The City’s Community Response and Recovery Fund will enable us to sustain the club and help it grow further.

“Dynamic Flame is a club that celebrates cultural diversity and is welcoming of all ages, backgrounds and abilities. The City’s funding will allow our club to deepen its connection with the local community and continue to enrich lives.”

Lisa Cole, Secretary of Brighton Seahawks Senior Football Club, said the Fund had provided a boost for the club, which would run at a loss this year due to COVID-19.

“Our affiliation fees are over $2,300 and we also are required to pay field, boundary and goal umpires,” Mrs Cole said.

“With other fees and equipment costs, the club was struggling to provide trophies and an end-of-season event for our players. There were also very few sponsorship opportunities available, further affecting the club.”

“Thanks to the City’s Community Response and Recovery Fund, our club will be able to purchase much-needed equipment and pay our affiliation fees.”

Please visit the City’s website to find out more about community funding.

AAA rating reaffirmed by S&P

Source: Australian Treasurer

Following Standard & Poor’s (S&P) reaffirming its AAA credit rating today, Australia remains one of only nine countries around the world to hold a AAA credit rating from all three major credit rating agencies.

Despite a once in a century pandemic, which “wreaked havoc on the global economy and government balance sheets around the world”, S&P has reaffirmed Australia’s AAA credit rating following the release of the Morrison Government’s Economic Recovery Plan to create jobs and secure Australia’s future.

In its report, S&P notes that the Morrison Government’s “balance sheet was strong before the pandemic” and that “Australia’s budget improved in recent years on the back of tight fiscal discipline, strong labour market conditions, and high commodity prices.”

S&P further states that “Australia’s typically strong fiscal performance remains a credit strength for the rating” and that “Australia’s economy is beginning to recover from its first recession in almost 30 years” and will “rebound strongly once borders open”.

Today’s decision by S&P is a further vote of confidence in the Morrison Government’s response to the health and economic crisis caused by COVID-19. The record levels of economic support we have provided has helped save 700,000 jobs. 

The Government has been able to do this because we entered this crisis from a position of economic strength and had brought the Budget back to balance for the first time in 11 years. This gave us the fiscal firepower when we needed it most.

Our economic support has been provided in a temporary, targeted and proportionate manner. By doing so we have protected the structural integrity of the Budget, with over 90 per cent of the spending committed in response to the crisis occurring over the next two years.

There is still a long way to go in recovering from this health and economic crisis but the Australian economy is fighting back with around 60 per cent of the 1.3 million people who lost their job or were stood down on zero hours in April now back at work.

Next calendar year, the economy is forecast to grow by 4.25 per cent, and unemployment to fall to 6.5 per cent by the June Quarter 2022. Our economic and fiscal strategy sets out the path to grow the economy, stabilise debt, and then reduce it over time.

Consumer confidence increased 11.9 per cent in October, the largest increase in a Budget month on record since the series began in 1974 with Westpac Chief Economist, Bill Evans, commenting that it was “an extraordinary result” and that “such a development must be attributable to the response to the October Federal Budget.”

The Morrison Government’s Economic Recovery Plan is focused on job creation, rebuilding our economy and securing Australia’s future.