Registration bans on the cards for offensive vehicles

Source: Government of Australia Capital Territory

Released 21/01/2020

Vehicles bearing indecent, insulting or offensive words or images may have their registration refused, cancelled or suspended in the ACT if the responsible person does not take action to remove the words or images.

Amongst other vehicles this regulation could apply to ‘Wicked Campers’.

In February 2017, the ACT Government announced that vehicles bearing offensive slogans de-registered in other states will not be eligible for registration in the ACT.

The ACT Government has now further stepped up its efforts to ensure that vehicles bearing offensive language or images will not remain or be able to be registered in the ACT and is committed to a national approach to ensure that these vehicles will find no ‘safe haven’ in any jurisdiction.

Examples of words or images that the new laws apply to are those that are morally unacceptable, sexual material that is used in an exploitative or degrading manner, or negative words or images about any religion, race or culture.

“The ACT Government is committed to ensuring all people are depicted in a respectful, empowering and dignified way, including people of different cultures, ages, genders and abilities,” Minister for Road Safety Shane Rattenbury said today.

“We have seen some extremely offensive slogans and images portrayed on vehicles in other States, and we want to ensure that these will have no place on ACT roads.”

Canberrans can report vehicles displaying offensive, insulting or indecent words or images to Access Canberra on 13 22 81 or via the Access Canberra website.

– Statement ends –

Section: Shane Rattenbury, MLA | Media Releases

Media Contacts

«ACT Government Media Releases | «Minister Media Releases

ACT Corrective Services supporting bushfire aircrew staff

Source: Government of Australia Capital Territory

Released 20/01/2020

Detainees and staff at the Alexander Maconochie Centre (AMC) have been supporting bushfire aircrew staff in NSW by providing much needed meal supplies.

Since 3 January, detainees and staff have prepared lunch packs, dinners and breads at the AMC Bakery and Kitchen for air crews in Adaminaby, Moruya, Cooma, Batlow and Talbingo. Lunch packs include freshly made rolls with various fillings and fresh fruit, milk and bread. Dinner meals are snap frozen and include dessert.

“This has been a challenging time, and detainees at the AMC, like other members of the Canberra community, wish to contribute to the bushfire crisis effort,” said Minister for Corrections, Shane Rattenbury .

On Friday, ACT Corrective Services also celebrated its second National Corrections Day with awards to mark the occasion.

Two special commendations were issued to the AMC Stores Team and AMC Kitchen for their assistance in providing meal packs and other food items to the ACT Emergency Services Agency for distribution to frontline staff fighting the bushfires in the ACT region.

Other awards were granted to a variety of successful programs, including evidence-based sexual offender programs.

Minister Rattenbury said that the commendations were a way to highlight the extra effort that staff in ACT Corrective Services displayed to their community in often challenging circumstances.

– Statement ends –

Section: Shane Rattenbury, MLA | Media Releases

Media Contacts

«ACT Government Media Releases | «Minister Media Releases

Woman charged following fatal collision in Caulfield South

Source: State of Victoria Police

Tuesday, 21 January 2020 10:31

Major Collision Investigation Unit detectives have charged a 30-year-old woman following a collision that claimed the life of a pedestrian in Caulfield South last year.

An 82-year-old man was crossing Hawthorn Road when he was struck by a car about 12.40pm on 24 August.

He was taken to hospital where he later died.

A Brighton East woman has been charged with dangerous driving causing death and will appear at the Melbourne Magistrate’s Court tomorrow.

Leading Senior Constable Melissa Seach

Media Officer

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NSW Health advice to travellers returning from Wuhan, China

Source: New South Wales Health – State Government

Chinese Health officials have confirmed more than 200 cases of the infection, including people who travelled from Wuhan to other parts of China and to at least four other countries in Asia.
No cases of the novel coronavirus have been detected in NSW.
Director of Health Protection, NSW Health, Dr Jeremy McAnulty said advice is being provided to travellers who may have already returned to NSW from Wuhan as it can take up two weeks for symptoms to develop.
“Symptoms of the virus include a fever with respiratory symptoms such as a cough, sore throat or shortness of breath,” Dr McAnulty said.
“There is no need for alarm, but people should be aware of the emerging situation and if they develop symptoms on returning from affected areas overseas, they should call ahead before seeing their GP.
“This virus does not appear to spread easily between people, but anyone with symptoms should practise simple hygiene by covering their coughs and sneezes with a tissue or their elbow and washing their hands thoroughly.”
While the Australian Government Department of Health in consultation with the Australian Government Department of Agriculture has the lead for health matters at the Australian border, NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard said public health officials here are working with the Commonwealth and other jurisdictions to monitor the situation in China.
“Sydney is a popular destination for people travelling from China especially around the time of the Lunar New Year, so up-to-date health advice is paramount,” Mr Hazzard said.
Health workers in NSW public hospitals as well as community-based General Practitioners have already been issued precautionary advice to help them identify  any cases of the infection and to apply careful infection control measures to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. NSW Health will continue to update all relevant health professionals: www.health.nsw.gov.au/Infectious/alerts/Pages/default.aspx
 NSW Health has made novel coronavirus 2019 a notifiable disease under the Public Health Act. Under this requirement, doctors and laboratories must report any suspected cases to NSW Health.
NSW Health has developed and exercised a range of procedures for case finding, diagnosis, and contact tracing for high consequence infectious diseases (such as pandemic influenza, SARS, MERS, and emerging infections) should they occur in NSW.People who are heading overseas should also check the advice on Smart Traveller (smartraveller.gov.au). General advice for overseas travellers includes avoiding animals (alive or dead) and animal markets, and avoiding close contact with sick people.

Structure Fire – Fly Creek

Source: Northern Territory Police

Investigations have commenced after a fire caused extensive damage to a dwelling in Darwin’s Rural Area.

Shortly before 1.00pm today a structure fire was reported at a residential premises in Fly Creek.  Firefighters from Humpty Doo responded and were assisted by crews from Palmerston and Bushfires NT.

No injuries were reported, but the dwelling was extensively damaged.  A crime scene has been established, fire investigators and detectives continue their assessment of the scene.

Missing teen Briley Dickson

Source: State of Victoria Police

Tuesday, 21 January 2020 07:51

Police are appealing for public assistance to help locate missing 17-year-old Briley Dickson.

Briley was last seen on 28 December in the Frankston area.

Police have concerns for his welfare due to his age and the length of time he has been missing.

Briley is Caucasian with short brown hair, a medium build and has two small tattoos on his right hand.

He is known to frequent the Frankston and Clarinda areas.

Police have also released an image of Briley in the hope someone recognises him and can provide information regarding his current whereabouts.

Anyone with information about Briley is asked to contact Frankston Police Station on 9784 5555.

Leading Senior Constable Melissa Seach

Media Officer

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Macquarie announces €90 million Spanish solar debt investment

Source: Macquarie Corporation

London / Madrid, 20 Jan 2020

Macquarie Infrastructure Debt Investment Solutions (“MIDIS”) has continued to support the growth of Spain’s renewables sector, announcing the close of a €90 million debt investment in a portfolio of solar farms.

The 127 MW portfolio, owned by leading Spanish solar developer Grupo T-Solar, is comprised of 23 ground-mounted solar farms across Spain. MIDIS’ investment was made via 18-year, amortising, fixed-rate, senior secured bonds on behalf of its global infrastructure debt strategy. MIDIS was the single-largest lender in Grupo T-Solar’s €568 million portfolio refinancing and worked closely together with Deutsche Bank and Santander, Mandated Lead Arrangers and Global Coordinators of the issuance for the sponsor.

Tom van Rijsewijk, Managing Director, MIDIS, said; “We are delighted to be supporting Spain’s transition to a new energy mix – partnering with leading sponsors like Grupo T-Solar to provide institutional investors with attractive opportunities in sustainable infrastructure debt. A transaction of this size, with MIDIS as the largest participant, demonstrates continued investor confidence in the market against a backdrop of positive regulatory developments, and MIDIS’ strength in the Euro renewables market.”

Manuel Fernández Durán, Chief Financial Officer, Grupo T-Solar, said; “As we lead the development of new green infrastructure around the world, it is vital that we have strong and effective partners to support the execution of our growth strategy. Macquarie has been a constructive partner throughout this transaction, and we trust that this will be the beginning of a long and positive relationship between our two firms.”

Since 2012, MIDIS has invested €2.5 billion of infrastructure debt across more than 35 renewable energy projects with total installed capacity of approximately 12.8 GW.

Contact

Patrick Gallagher (London)
Macquarie Group
+44 77 9535 3820
Patrick.Gallagher@macquarie.com

About Macquarie Group

Macquarie Group Limited (“Macquarie”) is a diversified financial group providing clients with asset management and finance, banking, advisory and risk and capital solutions across debt, equity and commodities. Founded in 1969, Macquarie employs approximately 15,700 globally. At 30 September 2019, Macquarie had assets under management of €349 billion.

Doorstop interview, Treasury, Canberra

Source: Australian Treasurer

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Good afternoon. Overnight, more than 20,000 $400 payments were processed for children who are affected by the bushfires. This follows the Morrison Government’s announcements of support packages for the tourism sector, for Australian wildlife that have been injured by the fires, for primary producers, for mental health, for local governments, and just yesterday, for small business. The package of measures for small business were very important because the success of small business, getting back on their feet, will be critical to the long-term viability of those communities affected by the bushfires. There are grants of up to $50,000, loans of up to $500,000, tax relief as well as access to financial counsellors.

Also last night, the IMF released an update to it’s global economic outlook and while it slightly downgraded global growth, it did point to some positive signs and stabilisation in the global economy off the back of developments in relation to Brexit and the phase one trade deal between China and the United States.

Here in Australia, the most recent economic data for the November period shows that unemployment had fallen to 5.2 per cent and 40,000 new jobs were created. Retail sales saw their best result in more than two years – monthly retail sales. And we also saw building approvals significantly up and we’ve seen a stabilisation in the housing sector.

So while other countries around the world, including South Korea, the United Kingdom and Singapore, saw quarters of negative economic growth last year, the Australian economy continues to grow and continues to be remarkably resilient in the face of not just the bushfires, but the comprehensive drought that we have seen, as well as the global trade tensions. Any questions?

QUESTION:

Overnight the Bank for International Settlements issued a fairly wide-ranging and interesting report on climate change and whether it’s a financial systemic risk. Do you agree that it is a risk to the financial systems?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Our own Reserve Bank of Australia has talked about the importance of the issue of climate change and how it is working on the impacts of that to the economy. But also, you’ve got APRA and ASIC who have also talked about the climate change issue. But what the report also points out is the need for a balanced approach; a balanced approach which sees not only emissions reduction, but adaptation, mitigation and resilience measures put in place without compromising the strength of the economy. The report points to the work of Government as well as the private sector in meeting that objective. 

QUESTION:

Do you have any concerns about the Reserve Bank having to take ownership of isolated assets such as a coalmine or a fossil fuel power station?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

I can’t see that happening.

QUESTION:

The Auditor General has questioned whether Bridget McKenzie had the legal authority to handout sports grants. Are you preparing, or is the Government concerned about legal challenges?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

The Attorney-General has provided comment on that matter, referring to the Auditor General’s comments about the legal authority and he said he would give further consideration to that issue, so I will leave that in his hands.

QUESTION:

Do reports like these erode public trust in government?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Let’s be very clear; and as the Prime Minister has said all the projects were eligible under this program. All the money has gone to community projects, including to the Leader of the Opposition and the former Leader of the Opposition’s own electorate and that is really important here because the purpose of the program was to support eligible projects and to support local community sporting clubs with repairs, lighting, women’s changing rooms and a whole series of other, what you would agree, I’m sure, are important benefits to those sporting communities.

QUESTION:

Do you accept though that there were more sporting clubs that were more eligible that were overlooked by Bridget Mckenzie?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

As I know, all those projects were eligible and the decision to…

QUESTION:

But some that got money weren’t as eligible as others, because they were in marginal electorates.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

These projects were across a variety of electorates across the whole country and, as you know, the Labor Party got more projects in their electorates than initially. 

QUESTION:

Your electorate received more than $700,000 in grants, it’s one of the richest in the country. Why do you think they are more deserving than other sporting clubs in the country? 

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

There are projects that are deserving in all electorates. The point about the sporting clubs in everyone’s electorate is that often they do their own fundraising, they don’t often get access to state or federal or local government financial support and a lot of them survive off the smell of an oily rag. They are important meeting places for the community. We obviously want to encourage recreation, we want to encourage more female participation in sport. But the projects were awarded to those eligible applications and those applications were made in the normal process.  

QUESTION:

You cannot account for how 73 per cent of the grants in the third round went to marginal seats, when marginal seats make up about one in five of the 151 electorates in the country. That is way out of line.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Shane, projects were awarded across the country.

QUESTION:

Do you accept though the finding saying that they’re all eligible, but found distributional bias and found that it targeted marginal seats and they were targeted, do you accept that finding?

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

Well in terms of the recommendations of the Auditor General the Prime Minister already said, those that relate to us we’ve accepted…

QUESTION:

…so you’ve accepted (inaudible)….

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

… and we’ll go ahead and implement the recommendations that the Auditor General has made and as you’ve heard it’s been referred to the Attorney General in relation to those issues that we’ve earlier discussed. But as the Prime Minister made very clear yesterday, no rules were broken, all the projects were eligible, the money went into these sporting communities across electorates, across the country including in many Labor electorates.

QUESTION:

You’re here at the Treasury building, do you have any updates for us on whether the bushfire crisis and the money that you’re spending on that is going to be having an impact on the surplus?

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

Well our absolute first priority is on meeting the human cost of the bushfires. It’s been absolutely devastating, and terrible for the people who have been affected, lives have been lost, property has been lost and it will take years to rebuild. Now the benefit of having a strong economy is that you can spend on areas of need at times of economic shocks or at times of national crises, as is the bushfire situation, and we have done so with a $2 billion National Bushfire Recovery Fund without increasing taxes. This is a critical point. When Labor were in they would whack levies on, higher taxes. In fact they went to the last election with $387 billion dollars of higher taxes. We went to the last election promising lower taxes and that’s what we have legislated through the Parliament since. So when it comes to our bushfire response, we will do what is required to support those communities in need. I will not provide a running commentary on the situation of the Budget, other than to say that the Budget is updated, or the forecasts are updated twice a year, forecasts are updated twice a year, at MYEFO and at Budget, so you’ll need to tune in in May on Budget night.

QUESTION:

So you’re saying that you’re happy to sacrifice the surplus?

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

Our focus has been on delivering the services and the support to the people in need and that’s what we’ve been doing. Scott Morrison has been out in front announcing significant programs of support that have been very well received. Ministers, including the Prime Minister who’s been present, have convened roundtables. I met here in Treasury with the financial services industry, I’ve met with the insurance industry, I’ve been talking to the banks, we met with small businesses, we’ve met with the charities. I’m getting the feedback from those on the ground as to how we can best support those people in need. And our initiatives to date include money for mental health, money for small business, money for primary producers, money for wildlife and habitat support, money for local councils as well as the money that has started to transfer from overnight to children who are getting back to school who have been in bushfire affected areas. So working closely with the states, we will do what is required to support those in need as all Australians would expect us to do.

QUESTION:

So is this the standard now? Is this the standard that Australians should expect that the Morrison Government will spend taxpayer money to boost their election chances?

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

The Morrison Government is focusing on supporting communities whether in bushfire affected areas, whether it’s in drought affected areas, whether it is local communities who are getting sporting grants, the focus of our Government is supporting those communities in need right across the country.

QUESTION:

Has Bridget Mckenzie breached Ministerial Standards? They say that Ministers are supposed to use their powers, you know, fairly and to take into account merit, so has she breached those guidelines?

JOSH FRYDENEBRG:

As I said, the projects that were awarded, the grants were all eligible, the rules were kept to, and the money was spent on community projects right across the country helping these sporting communities have the facilities and the support that they need. Thank you.

Interview with Chris Kenny, Sky News, Canberra

Source: Australian Treasurer

Chris Kenny:

Thanks for joining us Treasurer, appreciate your time. First up…

Josh Frydenberg:

Good to be with you Chris.

Chris Kenny:

Treasurer, do you know who Matt Kean is and have your Federal Cabinet colleagues come to you urging deeper carbon emissions cut from the Federal Government?

Josh Frydenberg:

Look I haven’t spoken to Matt Kean and those reports are false. What I am focused on, what the Prime Minister is focused on is meeting and beating our 2030 targets as we have been meeting and beating our earlier emissions reduction targets but to do so in a way that’s economically responsible, that doesn’t sacrifice jobs and that sees Australia do its part, as part of a global agreement.

Chris Kenny:

Well it’s not a matter of reports being wrong it’s a matter of whether Matt Kean is correct or not and you’re saying you haven’t spoken to him. Does that mean you’ve never spoken to Matt Kean or just you have not spoken to him recently about climate policies?

Josh Frydenberg:

No I’ve met Matt Kean before but I haven’t spoken to him about these issues and the reports saying that cabinet ministers have been lobbying me for a change of policy is false.

Chris Kenny:

So none of your cabinet or indeed backbench colleagues have come to you and urged you to push for deeper carbon emissions cuts?

Josh Frydenberg:

What my colleagues have been focused on is ensuring that Australia meets and beats our emissions reduction targets and they have been saying what the Prime Minister has been saying which is we’ll do so in a responsible way that we accept the climate science and that we’ve got a good story to tell and we will adopt new technologies as we are doing, without adopting taxes which is the Labor Party’s policy when it comes to emissions reductions. So let’s be very clear…

Chris Kenny:

Hang on a second though…

Josh Frydenberg:

That’s what our focus is on.

Chris Kenny:

Have any of your colleagues come to you and said you need to ramp up your climate policies?

Josh Frydenberg:

The colleagues are not calling for, and they haven’t done so to me, an increase in our targets, what they’ve said to me is that we have a very good story to tell, that we are focused on reducing our emissions as part of an international agreement and that’s what we need to continue to do so in a responsible, economic way.

Chris Kenny:

So Matt Kean is the Energy and Environment Minister in New South Wales, he’s been slapped down not only by the Prime Minister, but also by the Deputy Premier, his own Deputy Premier, John Barilaro. Has he just reopened old Coalition and old Coalition schism over climate policy?

Josh Frydenberg:

Look, I’m not going to add to all this debate because I actually think it’s a side issue Chris, the real issue is about the Coalition delivering on its international commitments and the policies that it took to the last election which is to be responsible economic managers and responsible stewards of the environment. That’s what we are doing and as Treasurer I’m very focused in this context of having hotter, dryer, longer summers, that we have in place the policies and the technologies to save property and life and to ensure that we are and our communities are as resilient as possible in the face of these very dangerous fires that we’ve seen.

Chris Kenny: 

Just two quick questions on that though before we move on to the economy. One is there have been a lot of people in politics and the media saying these fires this summer were unprecedented. Now, no one would talk them down, too many people have died, too many peoples’ lives have been changed forever. It’s been a terrible fire season, but why are people saying things are unprecedented when we’ve had far worse tragedies only 10 years ago, back in Ash Wednesday in 1983, back into the early part of last century, back even in the 19th century. Why this desire to portray these fires as unprecedented?

Josh Frydenberg:

Well we’ve had significant natural disasters before, whether it’s bushfires, floods, cyclones, which have led to the loss of life and property. In this case as you know, millions of hectares have been burnt and a significant number of lives have been lost. I think what is particular about these fires is that they have occurred simultaneously across many states and they’ve been devastating in New South Wales, as they have been in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and indeed Tasmania and Western Australia as well we’re seeing impacts of this. So we are seeing major fire dangers across multiple states at a simultaneous time and that’s why it’s been very difficult for our brave volunteer firefighters and emergency service personnel to deal with.

Chris Kenny:

And just finally on this issue, we have to have an injection of reality into this, no matter the arguments for Australia playing its role in global climate action, we have to be able to tell everybody, voters in this country the facts and they are that no matter what Australia does or doesn’t do on climate policy it is not going to change of its self, the climate season in Australia and in fact historically of course, naturally we’ll always have a devastating fire threat in the Australian summer.

Josh Frydenberg:

But that’s why we’re part of a global agreement because we recognise that 1.3 per cent of the world’s emissions, we’re not the world’s biggest emitter, that’s obvious, but we do need to do our part and if you look at our performance since 2005 emissions are down around 12 per cent. In that same time, emissions have gone up in New Zealand, emissions are up by 67 per cent in China and 77 per cent in India, so Australia has performed relatively well compared to a number of other countries in reducing our carbon footprint. One in five Australian homes have solar panels on their roofs, we’ve been investing in Snowy 2.0, the Battery of the Nation with pumped hydro and wind opportunities in Tasmania and a second interconnector. We’ve adopted the reliability aspect of the National Energy Guarantee which is going to ensure that as more intermittent sources of power generation come into the market, into the grid, that we actually have the back-up power to support it when the wind’s not blowing when the sun is not shining. These are all the things that we are doing as a responsible economic actor and as part of reducing our carbon footprint which is what we should be doing.

Chris Kenny:

But the suggestion that this diminishes our bushfire threat in this country, the suggestion that if we’d left the Carbon Tax in place somehow our bushfire season wouldn’t have been as bad this year is absolute bunkum!

Josh Frydenberg:

Well it is bunkum to say that a tax would’ve solved the bushfires or prevented them because it’s just not true. What we do know is that the climate is changing, man is making a contribution to that. The climate is getting hotter and dryer and we’re seeing obviously a very severe drought at the moment as well which is contributed in part to the conditions where these bushfires have been absolutely devastating. But we need to be responsible, we need a balanced approach and that’s what the Prime Minister’s outlined to the Australian people ahead of the last election and that’s what we’re committed to implementing.

Chris Kenny:

I’ve got to get to your Budget and the economy. You’ve outlined today more of your bushfire response package, that will be welcomed, but it’s another hit on the Budget. Deloitte Access Economics today, Chris Richardson, his annual report, very gloomy about the prospects for economic growth this year. What’s your outlook for the economy and importantly, will you guarantee that this financial year will deliver the budget surplus you promised?

Josh Frydenberg:

Well as you know in the mid-year economic and fiscal outlook that the Finance Minister and I handed down just before Christmas it was forecast of a $5 billion surplus in the 19-20 year and that was before the spending that we had announced for the bushfire response and we’ve made it very clear, our first priority is delivering the economic resources to the people who need it, whose properties have been damaged, the small businesses that have been damaged, the primary producers that have lost their stock, the mental health challenges that have arisen as a result of…

Chris Kenny:

Yeah, we…

Josh Frydenberg:

Investments that we are making….

Chris Kenny:

We understand the priority and need for that but your promise of a surplus is now finished, you’re not promising or guaranteeing a surplus.

Josh Frydenberg:

Well Chris you’ll have to tune in like every other Australian on Budget Night in May to see those numbers reconcile but what I can tell you is that the economic impact is still to play out from the bushfires, but we have been very responsible economic managers and the benefit of that to the Australian people is that we now have the fiscal flexibility to respond to economic shocks and crises such as these bushfires. That’s why we are committed to living within our means and that’s what Australia is doing.

Chris Kenny:

Fifty per cent chance of a surplus or better?

Josh Frydenberg:

I’ll leave that to the commentators. What I will say is that the Australian economy is very resilient. We got through some pretty difficult times, trade tensions, Brexit, the ongoing drought and we’re still leaving within our means. We’ve announced an unprecedented $2 billion National Bushfire Recovery Fund, we’ve already made significant commitments under that and we’ll continue to make more but our focus is on delivering the economic resources to the people who are affected by the fires and the Australian people know that is why you have responsible economic management, so that you’re in a position to do what we are doing right now.

Chris Kenny:

Josh Frydenberg thanks so much for joining us.

Josh Frydenberg:

Good to be with you.

$845,000 upgrade to Mount Isa Animal Management facility, thanks to Palaszczuk Government

Source: Government of Queensland

The Palaszczuk Government has delivered $845,000 for an upgrade of the Mount Isa Animal Management Facility.

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath visited the recently upgraded facility on a visit to Mount Isa today ahead of its official opening in February.

Mrs D’Ath said the upgrade was delivered under the Palaszczuk Government’s enormously successful $600 million Works for Queensland program.

“Works for Queensland is generating jobs and investment in Mount Isa and the North West and supporting the local economy,” she said.

“It’s delivering improved infrastructure in Mount Isa like this much-needed upgrade of the city’s Animal Management Facility.

“This is yet another sign of the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to Mount Isa and the North West and to investing in services and facilities locals want.

“I want to congratulate Mayor Joyce McCulloch for delivering this improved infrastructure, which will be able to offer more humane care to lost and abandoned pets.”

Mayor Joyce McCulloch said she was very pleased with the end result, and the upgraded and refreshed facility will better serve the needs of the community for many years to come.

“The upgrade project really brought this facility into the 21st Century and it looks fantastic,” Cr McCulloch said.

“It was important to us that the facility was modernised and improved to a high standard and met community expectations, and I believe this upgrade has achieved that objective.

“I’m confident the Animal Management Facility’s customers will be impressed with the new, larger administration building and all of the new amenities that the facility now features.”

The upgrade includes the construction of a new administration building, animal-treatment clinic, dog exercise yard, stock-holding area and receiving bay, the installation of new fencing and automatic gates, landscaping, and the sealing of the new carpark and driveways.

Extensions have been built to many of the dog pens, which will assist staff members with cleaning as well as increasing floor space for the dogs.

A water-misting system installed in the cat-holding area to keep them cooler during the hotter months will also soon be installed in the dog-holding area.

Mrs D’Ath said the $600 million Works for Queensland program has supported Mount Isa Council with more than $8,900,000 to create or support over 200 jobs over its first two rounds.

Council estimates a further 133 jobs will be created in the third round of Works for Queensland (2019-21).

Media contact: Martin Philip 0407 675 008