Supply and wholesaling of medicinal cannabis products (MCP)

Source: Australian Department of Health

Wholesale supply of any finished therapeutic goods that are not included in the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (the Register), including medicinal cannabis products (MCP), is not consistent with the therapeutic goods regulatory framework.

A person who supplies unregistered MCP by wholesale is likely to contravene the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (TG Act). Those contraventions may result in regulatory action under the TG Act, and can also have implications for licences issued under the Narcotic Drugs Act 1967 (ND Act), Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations 1956 (CPI Regulations) and state and territory legislation.

The legal requirements that apply when supplying MCP depend on whether the supplier is the ‘sponsor’ of the goods. Both sponsors and persons who are not the sponsor are prohibited from supplying unregistered MCP by wholesale.

  • Summary
  • Starting materials for use in manufacturing MCP
  • Importing and manufacturing finished MCP
  • Loss of ‘direct control’ through a distribution agreement
  • Maintaining ‘Direct Control’ with distribution agreement in place
  • Supply of finished MCP by a sponsor
  • Supply of finished MCP by persons other than the sponsor

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Airport Watch launched at Canberra Airport to target growing crime threat

Source: Australian Federal Police

Editors note: Photos from the launch are available via Hightail. Audio grabs are also available via Hightail

The Australian Federal Police is today launching a rebooted Airport Watch program at Canberra Airport to coincide with increasing domestic travel and the potential for growth in crime throughout the aviation environment.

With domestic travel likely to continue increasing throughout 2021, the AFP will use Airport Watch to alert the public and aviation workers about what suspicious activity looks like and how to report it to authorities.

Aviation staff, retail employees and others at Adelaide, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Darwin, Gold Coast, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney airports will receive training and educational resources.

COVID-19 has created significant shifts within the aviation environment, including the employment of staff who have never worked at airports before.

AFP Airport Police Commander at Canberra Airport, Simon Henry, said it was an ideal time to revive and strengthen security measures at Canberra Airport and throughout Australia’s aviation network.

“The public plays a critical role working with police every day to keep their communities safe. The aviation environment is no different,” Commander Henry said.

“I am today calling on Canberrans and those passing through our city to keep your eyes and ears open as you embark on domestic travel over the coming year.

“Due to COVID-19 significantly disrupting both the aviation industry and organised crime supply chains, it is important to prevent any attempts by criminals to exploit the disruption to their own criminal ends. Aviation industry staff, and the public can make meaningful contributions to the prevention of such exploitation.

“The AFP knows crime can be facilitated by trusted insiders. Airport Watch aims to educate those working in and traveling through major airports about what should be reported and how.

“In Canberra, this initiative builds on the AFP’s close relationship with both Canberra Airport and the local community.

“Our message is: if you see or hear something unusual while working at or travelling through one of our major airports, please call the AFP’s Airport Watch on 131 237 – it might just prevent a crime and bring perpetrators to the attention of authorities.”

Canberra Airport Head of Aviation, Michael Thompson said:

“Safety and security is critically important to Canberra Airport, its day-to-day operations and all our airport users. We welcome and support the reactivation of Airport Watch by the AFP which strengthens our current security measures at the airport.”

Suspicious activity or unusual behaviour includes:

  • A person observed displaying an unusually keen interest in security procedures;
  • A person observed recording or taking photos in or around sensitive areas of the airport;
  • Anyone acting strangely or in an unusual manner;
  • Anyone heard asking questions to gain information about the airport; and
  • Anyone trying to gain unauthorised access to secure areas.

As part of the campaign, the AFP will also be highlighting how airport staff and the public can recognise and respond to human trafficking, slavery and slavery-like crimes; the physical movement of people across and within borders through deceptive means, force or coercion.

“Airport staff are the first point of contact for people being trafficked into Australia, and the last line of defence for people being trafficked out of Australia,” Commander Henry said.

“This is where we have the best chance of stopping harm from occurring before the person goes off-shore, or goes into our community where offending happens behind closed doors.

“Airport staff have an important role to play in protecting people who are vulnerable to these exploitative crime types, particularly as international travel increases again.”

The AFP encourages airport staff and the public to report any suspicious activity, such as someone being moved through the airport against their will, or not being allowed to answer questions about their travel themselves.

For more information on human trafficking and the signs to look for, visit the website. FY20 human trafficking and slavery statistics can also be found on the website.

If you or someone you know could be a victim of this crime type, please report it by calling 131 AFP (237). 

Airport Watch complements the AFP’s existing capabilities, which include community policing and counterterrorism first response capability, air security officers, joint intelligence teams and joint investigation teams, bomb appraisal officers and firearms and explosives detection canines.

Airport Watch, first launched in 2012, offers a hotline (131 AFP) for reporting unusual and concerning behaviour.

The national launch of Airport Watch took place at Sydney Airport on 24 March 2021, as part of a national rollout taking place over the coming months.

For more on Airport Watch and the suspicious behaviour to look out for, visit the website.

Media enquiries

AFP Media: (02) 5126 9297

Tantanoola fatal crash due to medical episode

Source: South Australia Police

The death of a man in a road crash at Tantanoola Road, Tantanoola on Thursday 24 March 2021, has been determined to be due to a medical episode.

As a result this death will not be counted in the ‘Lives Lost’ road total.

There have now been 36 lives lost on our roads as compared to 33 for this time last year.

New arrival requirements for travellers arriving at Adelaide Airport

Source: South Australia Police

As of 12:01am Wednesday 14 April 2021, there is a new “Self Check-in” for travellers arriving in South Australia.

All travellers who wish to enter South Australia are required to complete and lodge a Cross Border Travel Registration prior to their travel. Prior to the arrival date travellers will receive an email from the South Australia Police which contains a link allowing them to automatically self-check-in upon arrival. Other options available on the email will allow the traveller to advise they are no longer travelling.  Should a traveller have an on-going approval to travel they may use the same email to check-in each time they arrive.

In conjunction with the Cross Border Travel Registration process, all travellers should download the mySA GOV app from Google Play or the App Store prior to travel to South Australia. Travellers are required to use the COVID Safe Check-In to scan a QR code specific to the Adelaide Airport immediately after their arrival. .   If unable to download the app, traveller may use thier smartphone camera until they are able to do so.

For travellers who do not have a smartphone, they must provide their relevant contact details to a person authorised or required to collect such contact details.  SAPOL staff will be present at the airport to assist with Check-In processes.

Once in South Australia, travellers must use the COVID SAfe Check-In when arriving at a business, venue or event in South Australia.

Information about the COVID SAfe Check-In App can be found here: https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/restrictions-and-responsibilities/covid-safe-check-in

All existing directions, frequently asked questions and other information can be found here: https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/emergency-declarations

If you require further information you can call the SA COVID-19 Information Line on 1800 253 787 between the hours of 9am to 5pm 7 days per week or go to the SA Health website at www.sahealth.sa.gov.au or www.sa.gov.au/covid-19.

Invitation to comment – Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion listing

Source: Australian Department of the Environment and Energy

Comment on Listing Assessments

About the nomination and assessment

Each year on behalf of the Threatened Species Scientific Committee, the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment invites public nominations for items that merit listing as threatened under national environment law. The Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion was nominated for listing as a threatened ecological community in 2017 and was prioritised for assessment that year.

The Committee’s assessment and advice to the Minister for the Environment is due by 30 July 2021.

Proposed Conservation Status: Endangered or Critically Endangered

Distribution: Wet Tropics of North Queensland, from around Ingham (just south of the Cardwell Range) in the south to north around Cape Tribulation.

Invitation to comment

The EPBC Act requires the Threatened Species Scientific Committee to undertake public consultation on nominations accepted for a full scientific assessment. The Committee particularly seeks comments on whether the Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion is eligible for listing under the proposed conservation status, but also invites other relevant comments and information.

How can I get involved?

Read the consultation documents

The draft scientific assessment, in the draft Conservation Advice, recommends that the ecological community may be eligible for listing as Endangered (or Critically Endangered), based on evidence that it has declined in extent by approximately 70%; it has a very restricted geographic distribution, based on small patch sizes, coupled with demonstrable threats throughout the range; and  it has had a severe to very severe reduction in ecological integrity of the remaining patches of the rainforest due to clearing, legacy impacts of fragmentation (such as weed invasion), feral animals and other impacts such as changes to hydrology.

Draft Conservation Advice for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (PDF – 1.56 MB)
Draft Conservation Advice for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (DOCX – 1.04 MB)

Consultation Guides in plain language are also provided to help the public understand what this ecological community is and what listing ecological communities under the EPBC Act means for people who may have patches on their property.

Public Consultation Guide for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (PDF – 1.57 MB)
Public Consultation Guide for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (DOCX – 3.54 MB)

Consultation Guide for Traditional Owners for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (PDF – 150.11 KB)
Consultation Guide for Traditional Owners for Lowland Tropical Rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (DOCX – 677.62 KB)

Map – Lowland tropical rainforest of the Wet Tropics Bioregion (PDF – 2.35 MB)

Guidelines for Nominating and Assessing Threatened Ecological Communities

The Guidelines for Nominating and Assessing Ecological Communities are also available to explain the criteria and concepts by which an ecological community can be determined as threatened in a particular conservation category.

Send your comments

The Committee welcomes the views of experts, land managers, Traditional Owners, other stakeholders and the general public on the draft Conservation Advice for the ecological community.

Responses are required to be submitted by 19 May 2021.

You are welcome to forward this request to advise other relevant key people or groups in your networks about this opportunity for comment. We would greatly appreciate your help to get input from land managers and other agencies and groups involved with biodiversity conservation, land management, primary industries and planning.

Questions to guide comments can be found within the Draft Conservation Advice.

Please support your comments with information and data, preferably supported by published studies or observations. If some of that information is not published, indicate whether you would you be willing to be quoted as an expert or source (“personal communication”).

Responses are to be provided in writing either by email to: epbc.nominations@environment.gov.au

or by mail to:

The Director
Ecological Communities Section
Biodiversity Conservation Division
Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment
PO Box 858
Canberra ACT 2601

Privacy

Personal information that you provide will only be used for these purposes. Personal information may be disclosed to employees of Australian Government agencies assisting the Committee for the purposes outlined above. The Department will deal with personal information contained in, or provided in relation to, responses in accordance with its Privacy Policy.

Further, the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments have agreed to share threatened species assessment documentation (including comments) to ensure that all States and Territories have access to the same documentation when making a decision on the status of a potentially threatened species. This is also known as the ‘common assessment method’. As a result, any personal information that you have provided in connection with your comments may be shared between Commonwealth, State or Territory government entities to assist with their assessment processes.

Invitation to comment – Coastal swamp sclerophyll forests of south-eastern Australia listing

Source: Australian Department of the Environment and Energy

Comment on Listing Assessments

About the nomination and assessment

Each year on behalf of the Threatened Species Scientific Committee, the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment invites public nominations for items that merit listing as threatened under national environment law. The “Melaleuca dominated Temperate Swamp Sclerophyll Forests on Coastal Floodplains of Eastern Australia” was nominated for listing as a threatened ecological community in 2017 and was prioritised for assessment that year. The assessment recognised that the ecological community is also dominated to co-dominated by Swamp Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) and a new name, Coastal swamp sclerophyll forests of south-eastern Australia, has now been proposed for this community.

The Committee’s assessment and advice to the Minister for the Environment is due by 31 July 2021.

Proposed Conservation Status: Endangered

Distribution: Between the Great Dividing Range and the east coast from near Gladstone in Queensland, through New South Wales, to the Gippsland Plains east of the Strzelecki Ranges in Victoria.

Invitation to comment

The EPBC Act requires the Threatened Species Scientific Committee to undertake public consultation on nominations accepted for a full scientific assessment. The Committee particularly seeks comments on whether the Coastal swamp sclerophyll forests of south-eastern Australia is eligible for listing under the proposed conservation status, but also invites other relevant comments and information.

How can I get involved?

Read the consultation document

The draft scientific assessment, in the draft Conservation Advice, recommends that the ecological community may be eligible for listing as Endangered, based on evidence that it has declined in extent by more than 70%; it has a very restricted geographic distribution, based on small patch sizes, coupled with demonstrable threats throughout the range; and the ecological integrity of the remaining forests are further impacted by weed invasion, changes to hydrology and coastal development arising from increasing population pressure along the east coast.

Draft Conservation Advice (incorporating listing advice) for Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests of south-eastern Australia (PDF – 1.83 MB)
Draft Conservation Advice (incorporating listing advice) for Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests of south-eastern Australia (DOCX – 3.03 MB)

Map of the Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests in Queensland (PDF – 4.21 MB)

Map of the Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests in northern NSW (PDF – 5.08 MB)

Map of the Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests in south east NSW (PDF – 2.17 MB)

Map of the Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests in Victoria (PDF – 1.86 MB)

Consultation Guides in plain language are also provided to help the public understand what this ecological community is and what listing ecological communities under the EPBC Act means for people who may have patches on their property.

Public Consultation Guidelines for Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests of south-eastern Australia (PDF – 1.35 MB) – updated on 9 April 2021
Public Consultation Guidelines for Coastal Swamp Sclerophyll Forests of south-eastern Australia (DOCX – 7.39 MB) – updated on 9 April 2021

Guidelines for Nominating and Assessing Threatened Ecological Communities

The Guidelines for Nominating and Assessing Ecological Communities are also available to explain the criteria and concepts by which an ecological community can be determined as threatened in a particular conservation category.

Send your comments

The Committee welcomes the views of experts, land managers, First Nations peoples, other stakeholders and the general public on the draft Conservation Advice for the ecological community.

Responses are required to be submitted by 12 May 2021.

You are welcome to forward this request to advise other relevant key people or groups in your networks about this opportunity for comment. We would greatly appreciate your help to get input from other agencies and groups involved with biodiversity conservation, land management, primary industries and planning.

Questions to guide comments can be found within the DRAFT Conservation Advice.

Please support your comments with information and data, preferably supported by published studies or observations. If some of that information is not published, would you be willing to be quoted as an expert or source (“personal communication”)?

Responses are to be provided in writing either by email to: epbc.nominations@environment.gov.au

or by mail to:

The Director
Ecological Communities Section
Biodiversity Conservation Division
Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment
PO Box 787
Canberra ACT 2601

Privacy

Personal information that you provide will only be used for these purposes. Personal information may be disclosed to employees of Australian Government agencies assisting the Committee for the purposes outlined above. The Department will deal with personal information contained in, or provided in relation to, responses in accordance with its Privacy Policy.

Further, the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments have agreed to share threatened species assessment documentation (including comments) to ensure that all States and Territories have access to the same documentation when making a decision on the status of a potentially threatened species. This is also known as the ‘common assessment method’. As a result, any personal information that you have provided in connection with your comments may be shared between Commonwealth, State or Territory government entities to assist with their assessment processes.

2021 seasonal influenza vaccines

Source: Australian Department of Health

Influenza vaccines can change from year to year as new strains of influenza virus appear. This is one reason vaccination against influenza is given every year.

The Australian Influenza Vaccine Committee (AIVC) has reviewed data related to epidemiology, antigenic and genetic characteristics of recent influenza isolates circulating in Australia and the Southern Hemisphere, serological responses to 2019-2020 vaccines, and the availability of candidate vaccines viruses and reagents. Based on this review and the World Health Organization’s recommendation, the AIVC recommended the viral strains to be used for influenza vaccines in the 2021 southern hemisphere influenza season.

The TGA has accepted the recommendations of AIVC. This year there is a new A (H1N1)-like virus strain and a new A (H3N2)-like virus strain when compared to the composition of quadrivalent vaccines for Australia in 2020.

The egg-based quadrivalent influenza vaccines contain the following four viral strains:

  • an A/Victoria/2570/2019 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/Hong Kong/2671/2019 (H3N2)-like virus;
  • a B/Washington/02/2019 (B/Victoria lineage)-like virus; and
  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013 (B/Yamagata lineage)-like virus.

The composition of trivalent influenza vaccines is recommended to include the H1N1, H3N2 and the B Victoria lineage virus.

Cell-based quadrivalent influenza vaccines contain the following four viral strains:

  • an A/Wisconsin/588/2019 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • an A/Hong Kong/45/2019 (H3N2)-like virus;
  • a B/Washington/02/2019 (B/Victoria lineage)-like virus; and
  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013 (B/Yamagata lineage)-like virus.

Influenza and COVID-19 vaccination

Can I have the Influenza and COVID vaccine at the same time?

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) has advised that routine scheduling and giving of an influenza vaccine with a COVID-19 vaccine on the same day is not recommended. The preferred minimum interval between a dose of seasonal influenza vaccine and a dose of BNT162b2 (Pfizer) or ChAdOx1-S (AstraZeneca) is 14 days.

If an influenza vaccine has been inadvertently co-administered or given within a shorter interval than 14 days with a COVID-19 vaccine, revaccination with either vaccine is not considered necessary.

Further information for health professionals and consumers regarding influenza and COVID-19 vaccines is available from the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) website.

Registered products

For the 2021 influenza season, the following seven influenza vaccines, registered by the TGA, will be available for use in Australia for the age groups listed against each product.

Sponsor

Influenza vaccine

Age group

Sanofi-Aventis

Vaxigrip Tetra

6 months and over*

Fluquadri

6 months and over*

GlaxoSmithKline

Fluarix Tetra

6 months and over*

Seqirus

Fluad Quad

65 years and over

Afluria Quad

5 years and over

Flucelvax Quad

9 years and over

Mylan Health

Influvac Tetra

3 years and over

*Guidance for the dose in children aged 6–35 months is available in the product information

All 2021 southern hemisphere seasonal influenza vaccines available for use in Australia are quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs).

Flucelvax Quad, a quadrivalent vaccine produced using mammalian cell culture (for potential use in adults and children 9 years of age and older) will be available in the private market for the first time in Australia for the 2021 season. Another quadrivalent vaccine, Influvac Tetra, will also be available on the private market for children aged 3 years and older.

All other vaccines in the table above will be available free of charge on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Fluquadri will primarily be available on the private market but will be available for NIP doses as a backup to Vaxigrip tetra doses.

The dose of influenza vaccines for all ages is 0.5 mL.

For further information on individual vaccines, please refer to the relevant Product Information document or Consumer Medicine Information document.

In conjunction state and territory health authorities, the Department of Health will be closely monitoring adverse event reports during the 2021 influenza vaccination program.

Vaccines for use in children

For children, three vaccines are available from 6 months and over: Fluquadri, Fluarix Tetra and Vaxigrip Tetra. Influvac Tetra is available for use in children 3 years and over, Afluria Quad for children 5 years and over, and Flucelvax Quad for children 9 years and over.

All children aged 6 months to less than 5 years are now eligible to receive free annual influenza vaccines under the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

The dose of influenza vaccines for all ages is 0.5 mL.

Vaccines for use in under 65s

Three vaccine brands are being supplied under the NIP in 2021 for people aged under 65 years who are in the following at risk groups: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, pregnant women, and people who have certain medical conditions: Vaxigrip Tetra, Fluarix Tetra and Afluria Quad. Vaxigrip Tetra and Afluria Quad are registered for all people under the age of 65 years.

Influvac Tetra and Fluquadri are also registered for use in people under the age of 65 years, however both will be available for purchase on the private market only.

Vaccines for use in over 65s

All seven vaccines in the above table of products are registered for use in those aged over 65 years. However, the adjuvanted QIV, Fluad Quad, is preferentially recommended over standard QIVs.

All people aged 65 years and over are eligible for free influenza vaccines under the NIP.

What is in the influenza vaccine?

Information on specific ingredients included within individual influenza vaccines can be found on the label of the medicine, the Product Information (PI) and Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) leaflets for each individual vaccine. You can ask your pharmacist for a copy or find it through our CMI database by searching the product’s name. The CMI provides the full list of ingredients for each product.

Additionally, information on medicines supplied in Australia, including ingredients, can be located by searching the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) either by product name or ARTG number.

Influenza vaccines available for the 2021 influenza season within Australia do not contain any thiomersal/mercury.

Formaldehyde is used in the early stages of manufacture of some influenza vaccines as an inactivation agent. The formaldehyde is removed in the latter stages of manufacture and the product is tested to ensure formaldehyde levels are below detectable limits before the final product can be released.

All influenza vaccines available this year are latex free. However, the possibility that the product may have come into contact with instruments which contain latex cannot be excluded. Patients who are extremely sensitive to latex should consult their doctor for advice.

Fluad Quad is the only product that contains an adjuvant to boost effectiveness of the vaccine in people aged over 65 years.

Further information

Information for health professionals is available from the ATAGI Influenza Statement. This includes information on the timing of vaccines becoming available for the 2021 season and also the recommended interval between influenza and COVID-19 vaccines

Information for consumers is available from NPS MedicineWise

Additional resources are available on the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance Website

For more information see Influenza vaccine: the annual Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine production and the regulatory approval timeline.

Reporting of adverse events following influenza vaccine

Health professionals and consumers are encouraged to report all adverse events associated with influenza vaccination in patients of any age to the TGA or through the current arrangements in their state or territory.

All reports contribute to the TGA’s ongoing monitoring of the safety of influenza vaccines.

The TGA cannot give advice about an individual’s medical condition. You are strongly encouraged to talk with a health professional if you are concerned about a possible adverse event associated with a vaccine or medicine.

Funding to help Canberra clubs cut costs and create new revenue sources

Source: Government of Australia Capital Territory

Public Health Emergency in the ACT

A Public Health Emergency has been declared in the ACT for the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. See the COVID-19 website for more information.

Released 13/04/2021

Seven community clubs have received funding as part of the ACT Government’s Diversification and Sustainability Support Fund, which helps Canberra’s clubs diversify their business models away from gambling-based revenue.

A total of $632,811 will be allocated to seven clubs to help fund initiatives like developing an Early Learning Centre, upgrading and reopening a kitchen and installing electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

“Community clubs are so important to Canberra’s social fabric,” Minister for Gaming Shane Rattenbury said. “They support our sporting teams, employ hundreds of people, and offer a place to meet and socialise for thousands of Canberrans.

“However, too many community clubs are highly dependent on pokies revenue, an activity we know causes harm to people, their families and communities.

“The ACT Government wants to reduce gambling harm, while at the same time secure a sustainable future for clubs.

“The Diversification and Sustainability Support Fund was established to assist clubs to diversify their income to sources other than gaming machines, contribute to projects that reduce regulatory costs, and provide skills development and training for club staff.

“The seven clubs that will receive payments in this round of grants have shown their dedication to a sustainable long-term future, a future that builds community and prevents harm.

“This fund is another example of the ACT Government’s commitment to support clubs so they can continue their important contribution to the life of our community.”

The Canberra Southern Cross Club is one of the organisations set to benefit from the fund, receiving over $100,000. Southern Cross Club CEO Ian Mackay said the funding will be used to reduce costs, improve customer experience and help ensure the precinct leads in environmental sustainability.

“This funding will be used to help us put in an electric vehicle charging station, solar panels and solar powered carpark lighting at the Yacht Club,” Mr Mackay said.

“Gaming machines were removed from the Canberra Southern Cross Yacht Club in 2014 and in 2019, the venue officially became ‘pokie-free’ when the club surrendered the Yacht Club’s authorisation certificate, meaning that gaming machines would not return to the site.

“The Canberra Southern Cross Club has a core strategy of diversifying income streams away from gaming machine revenue and to remain sustainable through providing services that our community needs. The two core areas of diversification have been into food and beverage excellence and health and wellness services.”

– Statement ends –

Section: Shane Rattenbury, MLA | Media Releases

Media Contacts

«ACT Government Media Releases | «Minister Media Releases

Technology Upgrade Fund to improve digital access, literacy

Source: Government of Australia Capital Territory

Public Health Emergency in the ACT

A Public Health Emergency has been declared in the ACT for the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. See the COVID-19 website for more information.

Released 13/04/2021

Community organisations can now apply for a grant from the ACT Government’s Technology Upgrade Fund, to upgrade IT equipment and improve digital access and literacy across Canberra.

Assistant Minister for Families and Community Services Emma Davidson said the grants program, with a total funding pool of $478,000, was co-designed in consultation with the community to ensure it has a positive impact and promotes equitable digital access across the ACT.

“The Technology Upgrade Fund was an election commitment noted in the 10th Parliamentary and Governing Agreement and I’m pleased the Government is delivering this for the community sector early in the term,” Minister Davidson said.”As we emerge from the health pandemic, thisprogram is part of building a better normal where all Canberrans can enjoy the advantages of doing things online.

“This program aligns with the ACT Government’s Digital Strategy, to meet the needs of Canberrans most at risk of digital exclusion. This includes older Canberrans, and people with disability accessibility requirements, including mobility restraints, by providing access through registered community organisations in the ACT.

“To ensure we’re boosting the right supports, we recently undertook consultation with the community sector and peak body groups to co-design the grant fund. Through co-design we identified the technology gaps and needs of organisations across the ACT.

“The Technology Upgrade Fund will support the sector to make improvements and access contemporary hardware, software and services. This includes training and education, with an aim to ensure everyone in our community has equitable access to digital support.”Grant a

Applications close at 5pm on Friday 30 April 2021. To apply, visit https://www.communityservices.act.gov.au/home/grants.

Applicants can request assistance from the Funding Support Team by emailing CSDServiceFundingSupport@act.gov.au.

– Statement ends –

Section: Emma Davidson, MLA | Media Releases

Media Contacts

«ACT Government Media Releases | «Minister Media Releases